Bay-Friendly Tips

Take These Bay-Friendly Actions to Protect and Improve Narragansett Bay

In Your Home & Backyard

Lawn fertilizer, household waste, and even our own beloved pets can be major sources of pollution to Narragansett Bay. With a few simple actions in your home and yard, you can save yourself money and time, while also saving water and preventing water pollution to our rivers, ponds, marshes and Bay.

Learn more >>

Storm drain marker volunteers

In Your Neighborhood

It takes a village to keep our drinking waters clean and our Bay swimmable, fishable and healthy. You can make a big difference for clean water in your neighborhood, town and state in many big and small ways.

Learn more >>

Fishing Boat

On The Water

We’d love to see a Narragansett Bay that’s fully swimmable, fishable, healthy, and accessible to everyone. And all who enjoy our local waters—whether that’s in it, on it, or around it— can help keep it clean by practicing a few simple, responsible tips.

Learn more >>

Did you know?

  • You can give your grass up to one-third of its nutrient needs by leaving clippings on the lawn?
  • Longer grass is healthier than shorter grass?
  • Most lawns down need irrigation and naturally survive droughts by doing dormant in the summer?
  • Fertilizer from your yard can pollute local waters?
  • It’s illegal to feed ducks and geese in Rhode Island?
  • One goose can produce up to a pound of poop per day?
  • Dog and goose poop that washes off the land is a leading cause of beach closures?
  • Volunteers collected 16,484 pounds of trash from RI beaches on a single day in 2017?
  • Even miles from the shoreline, everything that goes down a storm drain finds its way to our local waters.
  • Dog poop can take over one year to decay. Bacteria and parasites in dog poop can linger in the soil and seep into groundwater.
  • One tiny gram of dog poop contains 23 million coliform bacteria. It can also transmit e.coli. salmonella, parvo, and tapeworms.

Report pollution when you see it

Water ReporterThe Water Reporter App is the perfect way to let Save The Bay know when there’s a problem in our local waters. You can be our eyes and noses across the watershed. So if you see or smell anything that might be pollution, snap a photo, write a caption and send it to us on Water Reporter.

Available on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Hold your own shoreline cleanup

Clean Swell AppThe Clean Swell App lets volunteers upload important cleanup data in real-time to the world’s largest marine debris database. This database is used by scientists, conservation groups, governments and industry leaders to study ocean trash and take action to ensure trash never reaches our beaches.

Available on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Report flooding and storm surges

My Coast Logo

The MyCoast App lets you upload pictures that capture the highest tides, show storm damage and erosion and record localized flooding. By recording these events, you’ll help decision-makers, emergency managers and others make better decisions about how to protect our coastal communities and assets.

Available on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Hear From Our Donors & Volunteers

We support Save The Bay’s mission because we feel the health and sustenance of Narragansett Bay is arguably the most important factor in the State of Rhode Islan’d long-term success, economically and as a quality place to live.
- Joan and Rich, Donors
I led my first coastal cleanup about 27 years ago. I was concerned about the condition we were leaving our plant in for future generations and I wanted to do my part. I found Save The Bay was doing that in a variety of ways. Do you want to help preserve the natural workd? Then become active in an organization that protects irr. We do make a difference. You too can help save the planet a little piece at a time.
- Bill, Volunteer

Get Involved

What You Can Do Today To Help Narragansett Bay

Join a Beach Cleanup near you!

Join a Beach Cleanup near you!

Help Save The Bay remove trash left on beaches and shorelines all over the state. Beach cleanups are a great activity for clubs, corporate teams, families and individuals.

Sign up for a Cleanup
Practice Bay-Friendly Living

Practice Bay-Friendly Living

Learn and practice our lawncare and lifestyle tips to save you time and money, and save the Bay. Every small action by many people can make a big difference.

Visit Our Bay-Friendly Tips Page
Support Environmental Legislation

Support Environmental Legislation

Stand with Save The Bay in supporting a statewide ban on single-use plastics and legislation to establish the Ocean State Climate Adaptation and Resilience Fund.

Learn More and Take Action

Impact Stats

10,567

K-12 students

received marine science education programs last year

67,130

salt marsh grasses

were planted by Save The Bay staff and volunteers last year

1,222

water quality samples

were taken in the Pawcatuck River and Little Narragansett Bay

29,234

pounds of trash

were removed from the R.I. shoreline last year

Report pollution when you see it

Water ReporterThe Water Reporter App is the perfect way to let Save The Bay know when there’s a problem in our local waters. You can be our eyes and noses across the watershed. So if you see or smell anything that might be pollution, snap a photo, write a caption and send it to us on Water Reporter.

Available on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Hold your own shoreline cleanup

Clean Swell AppThe Clean Swell App lets volunteers upload important cleanup data in real-time to the world’s largest marine debris database. This database is used by scientists, conservation groups, governments and industry leaders to study ocean trash and take action to ensure trash never reaches our beaches.

Available on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Report flooding and storm surges

My Coast Logo

The MyCoast App lets you upload pictures that capture the highest tides, show storm damage and erosion and record localized flooding. By recording these events, you’ll help decision-makers, emergency managers and others make better decisions about how to protect our coastal communities and assets.

Available on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

You have funding options!

Educators, nothing should stand in the way of giving your students the educational experience of a lifetime: including a lack of funding. We want to support you in your search for funding and have compiled the tips and sources on this page to help you get started.

Ideas to consider:

  • Discuss funding options with your school’s PTA or PTO
  • Organize a fundraiser, such as a bake sale
  • Meet with your local Rotary Club
  • Research available grants for teachers and schools

Waterkeepers

Save The Bay’s three Waterkeepers engage in the collection and interpretation of data to inform the public and affect policy; urge our public officials to make protection of our most valuable resource a top priority, and hold them accountable for actions that affect Bay quality. As members of the Waterkeeper Alliance, which has more than 300 programs worldwide, Save The Bay’s Waterkeepers are part of a network of specialists with a passion for defending the environment and a devotion to working in their communities.

Baykeeper

Mike Jarbeau

As Save The Bay’s “eyes and ears” on Narragansett Bay, the Baykeeper identifies and responds to environmental threats by keeping in close contact with members of the Bay community and with environmental agencies. Save The Bay created the Baykeeper program in 1993 to strengthen our direct action, legal and regulatory watchdogging and pollution response capacity.
See pollution, or another issue, in the Bay? Report it to the Baykeeper:

EMAIL   FOLLOW

 

Coastkeeper

David Prescott

Our South County Coastkeeper works in the community—both on and off the water—to protect, restore, and promote stewardship of the unique and magnificent waterways of Little Narragansett Bay, the Pawcatuck River, and the South Coast. The Coastkeeper program was launched in 2007 from Save The Bay’s South Coast Center in Westerly, R.I., creating a Save The Bay presence in Southern Rhode Island.
See pollution, or another issue, along the coast? Report it to the Coastkeeper:

EMAIL  FOLLOW

Riverkeeper

Kate McPherson

Our Riverkeeper works to protect, restore, and promote stewardship of the vast network of remarkable rivers within the Narragansett Bay watershed, 60% of which is in Massachusetts. The Riverkeeper program was developed in 2016 to monitor Narragansett Bay’s tributary watershed, including the Blackstone, Ten Mile, Runnins, Palmer, Kickemuit, Cole, Lee and Taunton Rivers.
See pollution, or another issue, in our region’s rivers? Report it to the Riverkeeper:

EMAIL  FOLLOW

Many thanks to our generous 50th Anniversary sponsors:

 

Sage Family Foundation

 

 

Navigant logo

 

Thanks, Roger Williams University, for sponsoring our 50th anniversary celebration!

REI logo

 

 

Logo of FL Putnam, 50th anniversary celebration sponsor

 

 

 

BCBSRI, a 50th anniversary sponsor

 

 

Thanks, Absolut!

MOO, one of our generous 50th anniversary sponsors

Coast-To-Coast Promotional Products logo

Thank you to our 2019 Four Season Sponsors:

Sophia Shibles Logo

Logo of sponsor BayCoast Bank

Caster Communications logo

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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