Connecting with the global Waterkeeper network

Connecting with the global Waterkeeper network

by Topher Hamblett, director of advocacy

 

During a recent visit to Senegal, Director of Advocacy, Topher Hamblett, met Mbacke Seck, the Hann Baykeeper in the sprawling coastal fishing community of Hann, just south of the capital, Dakar.
Director of Advocacy, Topher Hamblett, visits Mbacké Seck, the Hann Baykeeper in Senegal.

During a recent visit to Senegal, I met Mbacké Seck, the Hann Baykeeper in the sprawling coastal fishing community of Hann, just south of the capital, Dakar. Like Save The Bay and our Baykeeper, Coastkeeper and Riverkeeper programs, The Hann Baykeeper is a member of the Waterkeeper Alliance, a group of 350 organizations committed to clean, fishable, swimmable waters.

Inspecting one of the pump stations of a water pollution control system being built thanks to the Hann Baykeeper's advocacy.
Inspecting one of the pump stations of a water pollution control system being built thanks to the Hann Baykeeper’s advocacy.

Mbacké (pronounced “Em-bach-eh”) is an inspiring advocate for clean water. During a tour of the Hann Bay waterfront, he shared his experiences battling sewage pollution, the rampant dumping of trash and his efforts to organize coastal cleanups, and the siting of coal-fired power plants. We visited various construction sites of a new wastewater collection system that will divert raw sewage from the beach that houses a local fishing fleet, and pipe it to a wastewater treatment plant twelve miles away.

MAP: Senegal
Hann lies just south of Senegal’s capital, Dakar.

Mbacké and I shared the stories of our respective organizations, and the similarities are striking. Having lived and worked in the West Africa region, I can say that the challenges faced by their environmental advocates are immense and complicated.

As we parted ways, Mbacké said, “We share the Atlantic Ocean. You have the West. We have the East. We’re stronger together.”

 

So here’s to Mbacké Seck, the Hann Baykeeper and friend of Save The Bay!

 

 

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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July 7, 2020

Dear Friends, Supporters and Community Members, 

At this time, Save The Bay’s facilities in Providence, Newport and Westerly remain closed to the public in response to COVID-19. All internship and public programs remain suspended at this time.

Save The Bay has begun to post limited volunteer opportunities with new procedures for the health and safety of volunteers. Pre-registration is required. Learn more at www.savebay.org/volunteer.

Our staff remains dedicated to working on our mission to protect and improve Narragansett Bay from home. As always, we are accessible via email (listed on our website), or on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.