Category

Improving Water Quality

A monarch butterfly in a rain garden in Charlestown, Rhode Island.

Green Infrastructure: One Water Quality Solution

Thursday, August 26, 2021

Green infrastructure is the utilization of nature-based solutions to try and filter runoff and return it to the Earth where it falls. These solutions range from residential rain gardens and neighborhood green spaces to permeable pavements and bioswales.

Green infrastructure is the utilization of nature-based solutions to try and filter runoff and return it to the Earth where it falls. These solutions range from residential rain gardens and... ...Read More

Outdoors, a man steps on the lip of a shovel, digging a runnel in the middle of a saltmarsh that is otherwise covered in brown and golden vegetation in April 2021.

Spades of work to save our salt marshes

Thursday, July 15, 2021

Salt marshes, like Winnapaug, across Rhode Island, face multiple and complex challenges to their continued survival. Digging runnels can help drain water off the marsh, so that’s just what our habitat adaptation staff and interns spent their spring doing!

Salt marshes, like Winnapaug, across Rhode Island, face multiple and complex challenges to their continued survival. Digging runnels can help drain water off the marsh, so that's just what our... ...Read More

Invest in the Bay and beyond; Vote YES on Question 2

Wednesday, February 3, 2021

Invest in the Bay and beyond: Vote YES on Question 2 UPDATE: On March 2, 2021, Rhode Island voters once again overwhelmingly approved investments in clean water, beaches, parks and open spaces. THANK YOU, voters, for saying YES to Question 2! Rhode Island is holding a special election on March 2, 2021 on a series … Read More

Invest in the Bay and beyond: Vote YES on Question 2 UPDATE: On March 2, 2021, Rhode Island voters once again overwhelmingly approved investments in clean water, beaches, parks and... ...Read More

Sites at Stake

Thursday, January 14, 2021

Sites at Stake Highlights of the watershed’s most threatened natural locations by Save The Bay’s Policy Team From salt marshes to beaches, popular and familiar sites around Narragansett Bay face myriad challenges in the coming decades as pollution, climate change and rising sea levels threaten valuable habitats, public access sites, and more.    Location: The … Read More

Sites at Stake Highlights of the watershed’s most threatened natural locations by Save The Bay’s Policy Team From salt marshes to beaches, popular and familiar sites around Narragansett Bay face... ...Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Maintain Your Septic 

Thursday, August 20, 2020

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Maintain Your Septic Mackensie duPont Crowley, Save The Bay’s communications specialist What happens to all of that wastewater from your toilet, sink or shower? For many homeowners, it gets piped to a central, wastewater treatment plant.  But for many others, wastewater is treated in a septic system, which is in the ground … Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Maintain Your Septic Mackensie duPont Crowley, Save The Bay’s communications specialist What happens to all of that wastewater from your toilet, sink or shower? For many homeowners,... ...Read More

Comments Submitted: Albion Dam Retrofit Permit Application

Monday, June 22, 2020

New England Hydropower filed an application to retrofit the Albion Dam to produce electricity. It proposes the construction of a temporary access road and a 20-foot-wide permanent access road along the Blackstone River that would destroy trees, reduce recreational opportunities, and could affect water quality.

New England Hydropower filed an application to retrofit the Albion Dam to produce electricity. It proposes the construction of a temporary access road and a 20-foot-wide permanent access road along... ...Read More

R.I. Legislators, Gov. Raimondo: We Need Narragansett Bay to Support Our Recovery

Monday, June 1, 2020

U.S. Sen. John Chafee once observed that “Narragansett Bay is good for the soul.” In the earliest days of the pandemic, Rhode Islanders sought solace — defined as “comfort or consolation in a time of great distress or sadness” — at the beaches, parks and shorelines that make the Ocean State our home.

U.S. Sen. John Chafee once observed that “Narragansett Bay is good for the soul.” In the earliest days of the pandemic, Rhode Islanders sought solace — defined as “comfort or... ...Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Plant a Buffer

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Plant a Buffer Kate McPherson, Save The Bay’s Riverkeeper Walking down my quiet, little street with my dogs I eye my neighbor’s leaf pile.  He’s the kind of guy who mows up all the leaves that fall on his lawn with his riding mower and deposits them on the edge of the … Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Plant a Buffer Kate McPherson, Save The Bay’s Riverkeeper Walking down my quiet, little street with my dogs I eye my neighbor’s leaf pile.  He’s the kind... ...Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Plant a Rain Garden

Friday, April 17, 2020

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Plant a Rain Garden Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Up to half of all polluted runoff, one of the main causes of beach closures and fish kills, comes from residential properties. The grass in your yard is not the most effective surface material to handle this rainwater, which washes pollutants like pesticides, … Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Plant a Rain Garden Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Up to half of all polluted runoff, one of the main causes of beach closures and fish kills,... ...Read More

Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Three)

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Three) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the tide on pollution—both as a political advocacy powerhouse and educational pillar in the community—for 23 years before the staff addition of a Baykeeper. A dynamic, … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Three) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the... ...Read More

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

Map

August 26, 2021

Dear Friends, Supporters and Community Members, 

At this time, Save The Bay’s facilities in Providence and Westerly remain closed to the public in response to COVID-19.

The Exploration Center and Aquarium in Newport reopened Monday, July 5, with new hours and visiting procedures in place.

Save The Bay is offering volunteer and internship opportunities with new policies and procedures for the health and safety of all involved.

Our staff continues to protect and improve Narragansett Bay, working both remotely and on-site. If you have any questions, you can contact us by phone (401-272-3540) or email (savebay@savebay.org), or on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.