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Latest News & Stories

Tributary river in a forest

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest

Thursday, February 28, 2019

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest by Kate McPherson, Narragansett Bay Riverkeeper Snow falls gently around the Narragansett Bay watershed; and the branches of the black oak, red maple and shagbark hickory are all bare. A month ago, despite the bitter cold, the white-breasted nuthatches in my … Read More

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest by Kate McPherson, Narragansett Bay Riverkeeper Snow falls gently around the Narragansett Bay watershed; and the... ...Read More

Photo of Save The Bay Swim in the 1970s

Building the Swim Network

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The Bay community show up in greater or more visible numbers.

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The... ...Read More

In 2018, Save The Bay presented the Rhode Island Saltwater Anglers Association with its Environmental Achievement Award.

Call for Nominations for Save The Bay environmental awards, open now through March 30

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Now through March 30, Save The Bay is accepting community nominations for its 2019 Environmental Achievement Award and Alison J. Walsh Award for Outstanding Environmental Advocacy.

Now through March 30, Save The Bay is accepting community nominations for its 2019 Environmental Achievement Award and Alison J. Walsh Award for Outstanding Environmental Advocacy. ...Read More

2017-2018 Seal Observations at Rome Point show a late-March peak

Save The Bay releases 2018 Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring Report, confirms stable seal population

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Save The Bay has released its third annual Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring Report, compiling decades of historical data with new information collected during last year’s seasonal monitoring efforts and the 2018 Bay-Wide Seal Count.

Save The Bay has released its third annual Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring Report, compiling decades of historical data with new information collected during last year’s seasonal monitoring efforts and the... ...Read More

Exploration Center and Aquarium staff work with Sealia, a life-sized, plush seal model, to illustrate facts and information about harbor seals.

“Sensational Seals” haul onto the scene at Save The Bay’s Exploration Center and Aquarium this February

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

This February, stop by the Exploration Center and Aquarium for fun and educational activities and games that focus on one of the region’s most endearing winter visitors: the “puppy-faced” harbor seal.

This February, stop by the Exploration Center and Aquarium for fun and educational activities and games that focus on one of the region’s most endearing winter visitors: the "puppy-faced" harbor... ...Read More

West Warwick Wastewater Treatment Plant during the 2010 Floods

To DEM: Reduce pollution by wastewater treatment facilities

Monday, February 4, 2019

Save The Bay is reviewing discharge permits for three of Rhode Island’s larger wastewater treatment facilities that are up for renewal by DEM. We are advocating that these permits be revised with stricter nitrogen limits, to continue progression toward meeting water quality standards in Narragansett Bay.

Save The Bay is reviewing discharge permits for three of Rhode Island’s larger wastewater treatment facilities that are up for renewal by DEM. We are advocating that these permits be... ...Read More

Harbor seal in beach surf

Counting Seals for 25 Years

Monday, February 4, 2019

Of all the volunteer projects I manage at Save The Bay, the Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring program is one of my favorites. Harbor seals are not only adorable and fascinating, they are a terrific success story of environmental protection. Monitoring them is fun for volunteers and the observations are essential for understanding seal activity in the Bay.

Of all the volunteer projects I manage at Save The Bay, the Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring program is one of my favorites. Harbor seals are not only adorable and fascinating,... ...Read More

Westerly Town Beach Erosion

Saving The Bay at the Statehouse

Monday, January 21, 2019

This legislative session, Save The Bay will continue to advocate for laws that protect Narragansett Bay, Little Narragansett Bay, our coasts and our watershed; push our priorities; be on the lookout for new threats; and focus on three major issues: climate change, plastics pollution and the improvement of the Coastal Resources Management Council.

This legislative session, Save The Bay will continue to advocate for laws that protect Narragansett Bay, Little Narragansett Bay, our coasts and our watershed; push our priorities; be on the... ...Read More

Headline from an old Bay Bulletin article: East Bay Communities Object to Dredging Plan

Improving Dredge Policy in Rhode Island

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from dredge plans that would have damaged the environment for many years, and will continue to do so to protect the Bay and its habitats from being buried in sedimentary spoils.

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from... ...Read More

Fishing in Hundred Acre Cove

Save The Bay and partners to develop water quality improvement plan for Hundred Acre Cove

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Hundred Acre Cove has been closed to shellfishing since the 1990s due to bacterial pollution, but Save The Bay and partners are working to reverse this long-standing trend. Over the next three years, Save The Bay and its bi-state partners will review pre-existing data, conduct an existing conditions assessment, and work with project partners to develop and implement a plan for future actions.

Hundred Acre Cove has been closed to shellfishing since the 1990s due to bacterial pollution, but Save The Bay and partners are working to reverse this long-standing trend. Over the... ...Read More

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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