Category

Blog

A Nature Cruise on the Pawcatuck

Thursday, December 20, 2018

This nature cruise was my first time seeing a seal in the wild, and what an experience it was! The seal perched on a small rock in the middle of the river in the “banana pose”—with its head and back flippers into the air.

This nature cruise was my first time seeing a seal in the wild, and what an experience it was! The seal perched on a small rock in the middle of... ...Read More

A rare calico lobster

The Many Colors of a Lobster

Monday, December 17, 2018

I am just amazed with how unique lobsters are, and as I think about the collection of Narragansett Bay lobsters at Save The Bay’s Exploration Center and Aquarium, the obvious thing that grabs my attention is their rare colorations.

I am just amazed with how unique lobsters are, and as I think about the collection of Narragansett Bay lobsters at Save The Bay’s Exploration Center and Aquarium, the obvious... ...Read More

A flotilla of shellfisherman help fight the Quonset Megaport

Putting a Stop to that Big Parking Lot

Thursday, December 13, 2018

A fraction of the spoils of this dredge would fill in 500 acres—roughly 380 football fields—of the Bay around Quonset to create new land for pavement. The Draft Master Plan began to circulate in 1997, and Save The Bay caught wind of the impending disaster that could unfold if Quonset’s “megaport” became a reality.

A fraction of the spoils of this dredge would fill in 500 acres—roughly 380 football fields—of the Bay around Quonset to create new land for pavement. The Draft Master Plan... ...Read More

Seaverge

New Boat. Same Mission.

Monday, December 10, 2018

New Boat. Same Mission. by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper When Save The Bay’s fleet of small boats is hauled out of the water this time of year for winterization, we try to ensure that at least one of our trailerable boats is ready to respond on the Bay if needed. And as we pulled Seaverge … Read More

New Boat. Same Mission. by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper When Save The Bay’s fleet of small boats is hauled out of the water this time of year for winterization, we... ...Read More

Comb jellyfish tank

A Day at the Aquarium: Check that off the Bucket List

Thursday, December 6, 2018

For intern Chris Cassaday, working at the aquarium for a day was a childhood dream come true. “Even as I pursued an education in creative writing, my passion for marine biology never faded. One of my lifelong dreams was to work at an aquarium, and Save The Bay helped me cross that off my bucket list.”

For intern Chris Cassaday, working at the aquarium for a day was a childhood dream come true. "Even as I pursued an education in creative writing, my passion for marine... ...Read More

Kate McPherson, Riverkeeper

This Riverkeeper is Passionate About All Things Upstream

Monday, December 3, 2018

Meet Kate McPherson, our new Riverkeeper. A lifelong Rhode Islander who grew up fishing with her dad, this wetlands ecologist hails from North Smithfield, in the Branch River Watershed, and now lives in Harmony, in the Woonasquatucket River Watershed.

Meet Kate McPherson, our new Riverkeeper. A lifelong Rhode Islander who grew up fishing with her dad, this wetlands ecologist hails from North Smithfield, in the Branch River Watershed, and... ...Read More

Save The Bay Membership and Individual Giving Manager Jackie Carlson with her family on a seal tour

What Our Members Mean

Thursday, November 29, 2018

What Our Members Mean by Jackie Carlson, membership and individual giving manager Save The Bay has been a member-based organization since 1970. What that means to us as an organization is that our members are critical to our efforts to protect and improve Narragansett Bay. What that mean to me, in my position as membership … Read More

What Our Members Mean by Jackie Carlson, membership and individual giving manager Save The Bay has been a member-based organization since 1970. What that means to us as an organization... ...Read More

BayCampers explore marine life in Narragansett Bay

Thank You For All of This

Monday, November 19, 2018

We were sitting on a mooring near Potter’s Cove on the west side of Prudence Island. The day could not have been any better, with the sun shining and a full day of marine science education behind us as our 20 or so campers enjoyed a swim off of the M/V Elizabeth Morris.

We were sitting on a mooring near Potter’s Cove on the west side of Prudence Island. The day could not have been any better, with the sun shining and a... ...Read More

Trash collected at Common Fence Point

A Tale of Two Beaches

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Littering. It’s as easy as the flick of your wrist—but at what cost? With the plethora of beach cleanups occurring throughout Rhode Island, some might believe that every beach is spotless, but they’d be wrong. Littering is a collective issue that affects everyone, and thankfully, we’re fortunate to have volunteers who help make sure trash doesn’t degrade local beaches. I had the pleasure of participating in two Rhode Island cleanups during the 32nd annual International Coastal Cleanup Day: First Beach in Newport and Common Fence Point in Portsmouth.

Littering. It’s as easy as the flick of your wrist—but at what cost? With the plethora of beach cleanups occurring throughout Rhode Island, some might believe that every beach is... ...Read More

River After Neighborhood

Where Have All The Rivers Gone?

Monday, November 12, 2018

We are deep in the headwaters of the Woonasquatucket River watershed in Glocester this morning, assessing road-stream crossings as part of Rhode Island’s River and Stream Continuity Pilot Project. Rivers and streams provide vital links connecting upland, wetland, and aquatic ecosystems… But there is growing concern about the role road crossings, and especially culverts, have in altering important habitats and ecosystems.

We are deep in the headwaters of the Woonasquatucket River watershed in Glocester this morning, assessing road-stream crossings as part of Rhode Island’s River and Stream Continuity Pilot Project. Rivers... ...Read More

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

Map