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Topher Hamblett testifying at the statehouse

2019 Legislative Update: Missed Opportunities for the Ocean State

Monday, July 1, 2019

LEGISLATIVE WRAP UP: A Year of Missed Opportunities The Rhode Island General Assembly’s 2019 session has come to a close. Save The Bay pushed tirelessly for legislation to reduce plastics pollution, protect the watershed from irresponsible large-scale solar development, and help fund climate adaptation and resilience projects. In the end, the General Assembly did not … Read More

LEGISLATIVE WRAP UP: A Year of Missed Opportunities The Rhode Island General Assembly’s 2019 session has come to a close. Save The Bay pushed tirelessly for legislation to reduce plastics... ...Read More

New Public Pier open at Fields Point

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

New Public Pier at Fields Point offers kayaking, touch-and-go docking, fishing and bird watching by Cindy Sabato, director of communications Mother Nature gave Save The Bay a sweet 50th anniversary gift on May 20. It was the first beautiful, sunny, warm day of the season, and it happened to the be the day we cut … Read More

New Public Pier at Fields Point offers kayaking, touch-and-go docking, fishing and bird watching by Cindy Sabato, director of communications Mother Nature gave Save The Bay a sweet 50th anniversary... ...Read More

NBEP workshop highlights efforts to improve Blackstone River and its watershed

Narragansett Bay Estuary Program workshop highlights efforts to improve Blackstone River and its watershed

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

The first known water quality complaints about the Blackstone River emerged in 1719, and by 1990 it was deemed “the most polluted river in the country.” But on April 29th, many of those who have contributed to improvement in the Blackstone met to discuss successes, strategies and plans for continued improvement.

The first known water quality complaints about the Blackstone River emerged in 1719, and by 1990 it was deemed "the most polluted river in the country." But on April 29th,... ...Read More

Brayton Point Cooling Tower implosions. Photo by Karyn Jimenez-Elliot

The end of the coal era in the Narragansett Bay watershed

Monday, April 29, 2019

The end of the coal era in the Narragansett Bay watershed by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper As we often say at Save The Bay, some of the greatest victories take the most time. On Saturday, the implosion of the Brayton Point’s twin cooling towers placed an exclamation point on the end of the coal era … Read More

The end of the coal era in the Narragansett Bay watershed by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper As we often say at Save The Bay, some of the greatest victories take... ...Read More

Jed Thorp, Advocacy Coordinator

Meet Jed Thorp: Coordinating community advocacy efforts for the Bay

Monday, April 1, 2019

Meet Jed Thorp: Coordinating community advocacy efforts for the Bay Jed Thorp joins Save The Bay as our first advocacy coordinator. He grew up in Ohio, but fell in love with Narragansett Bay shortly after moving to Rhode Island in 2013. He spent the last four years at The Public’s Radio 89.3FM, Rhode Island’s NPR … Read More

Meet Jed Thorp: Coordinating community advocacy efforts for the Bay Jed Thorp joins Save The Bay as our first advocacy coordinator. He grew up in Ohio, but fell in love... ...Read More

Pawcatuck River at the site of the old White Rock Dam

Victory for the Wood-Pawcatuck River Watershed

Monday, April 1, 2019

Victory for the Wood-Pawcatuck River Watershed by South County Coastkeeper David Prescott The greatest victories are not won overnight. They take time, the strength of many partners and a positive attitude to bring about change. After more than a decade, I am happy to report another significant win for our local waters—a win that guarantees … Read More

Victory for the Wood-Pawcatuck River Watershed by South County Coastkeeper David Prescott The greatest victories are not won overnight. They take time, the strength of many partners and a positive... ...Read More

Bird School student with spider crabs

A Trip to the Bottom of the Bay

Monday, April 1, 2019

Save The Bay’s education programs make Narragansett Bay available to every student in the watershed, many who would be unlikely to visit the coast otherwise, like this group from the Bird School in Walpole, Massachusetts.

Save The Bay’s education programs make Narragansett Bay available to every student in the watershed, many who would be unlikely to visit the coast otherwise, like this group from the... ...Read More

Protect Areas of Environmental Concern

Help Us Protect Areas of Environmental Concern: Improve R.I. House Bill 5789

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Stand with Save the Bay and let your legislators know that Rhode Island should not incentivize energy development in areas of environmental concern! Ask them to improve R.I. House Bill 5789.

Stand with Save the Bay and let your legislators know that Rhode Island should not incentivize energy development in areas of environmental concern! Ask them to improve R.I. House Bill... ...Read More

BWET 360 High School student Jeymi

How Students at Two Local High Schools Tackle Plastics Pollution

Monday, March 4, 2019

If the early years of the plastics war had a mascot, it would have been bottled water. The early generation of environmentalists did their best to convince the public of the hazardous impacts of single-use plastic bottles, but the American obsession persisted. Now, plastic waste has polluted waters everywhere, including Narragansett Bay. And, since plastic can take hundreds of years to break down, the burden of managing this problem will fall on the youngest among us today—which is why Save The Bay puts fostering the next generation of Bay stewards at the forefront of its education  programs.

If the early years of the plastics war had a mascot, it would have been bottled water. The early generation of environmentalists did their best to convince the public of... ...Read More

Tributary river in a forest

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest

Thursday, February 28, 2019

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest by Kate McPherson, Narragansett Bay Riverkeeper Snow falls gently around the Narragansett Bay watershed; and the branches of the black oak, red maple and shagbark hickory are all bare. A month ago, despite the bitter cold, the white-breasted nuthatches in my … Read More

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest by Kate McPherson, Narragansett Bay Riverkeeper Snow falls gently around the Narragansett Bay watershed; and the... ...Read More

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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