Our Work in Newport County

Save The Bay’s work is rooted in Newport County.

Photo of 1970 Life Magazine article about Save The Bay's first battle
In 1971, LIFE magazine printed a feature story about the brave decision by the Town of Tiverton to reject a proposed oil refinery along its shores. Several members of this community joined forces with others from Jamestown to form Save The Bay in 1970.

You could say that Newport County was the birthplace of the citizens’ movement to protect Narragansett Bay. That movement began in 1956, when 17 residents of Jamestown mobilized to defeat a proposed oil refinery on the north end of Conanicut Island. In the summer of 1970, a similar battle was waged in Tiverton by “Save Our Community,” whose members tapped the expertise of the people of Jamestown. And when that proposal was defeated, the two groups came together and created Save The Bay to serve as a statewide watchdog advocating for the best interests of the Bay and the people who depend on it.

Since then, Save The Bay’s presence and work in Newport County has been a constant. After all, with its treasured beaches, salt marshes, undeveloped open spaces, and stunning water views, Newport County is ideal for enjoying Narragansett Bay in every way possible.

Save The Bay is working near you!

Whether you’re looking to lend a hand as a volunteer or are simply looking for a fun outing for the whole family, Save The Bay is working nearby and offers plenty of ways to get involved!

Volunteer Opportunities

Events & Activities

Newport County highlighted in the Narragansett Bay watershed.
Newport County highlighted in the Narragansett Bay watershed.

3000

Newport County students

engaged in marine science and environmental education programs last year

In 2018, our Exploration Center and Aquarium served

30,246

Newport guests

2,700

visitors

ventured out with us on our Newport Seal Tours last year

Stories and News for Newport County

RIDEM enforcement cases deemed public record

Wednesday, October 7, 2020

RIDEM enforcement cases deemed public record by Kendra Beaver, staff attorney Enforcement of environmental law is critical to the health of Narragansett Bay, and the public has a right to know whether or not these laws are being enforced—but, without access to information about enforcement, we are left in the dark. That is why Save … Read More

RIDEM enforcement cases deemed public record by Kendra Beaver, staff attorney Enforcement of environmental law is critical to the health of Narragansett Bay, and the public has a right to... ...Read More

Historic win for the protection of Atlantic menhaden

Monday, August 31, 2020

Historic win for the protection of Atlantic menhaden by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper Menhaden are vitally important to the ecological health of Narragansett Bay. They are prolific filter feeders that remove nitrogen from Bay waters, and are an important food source for many of the Bay’s common species. In the spring, huge schools of menhaden … Read More

Historic win for the protection of Atlantic menhaden by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper Menhaden are vitally important to the ecological health of Narragansett Bay. They are prolific filter feeders that... ...Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Maintain Your Septic 

Thursday, August 20, 2020

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Maintain Your Septic Mackensie duPont Crowley, Save The Bay’s communications specialist What happens to all of that wastewater from your toilet, sink or shower? For many homeowners, it gets piped to a central, wastewater treatment plant.  But for many others, wastewater is treated in a septic system, which is in the ground … Read More

Bay-Friendly Living Tip: Maintain Your Septic Mackensie duPont Crowley, Save The Bay’s communications specialist What happens to all of that wastewater from your toilet, sink or shower? For many homeowners,... ...Read More

Over The Years

Explore Save the Bay's history of work in Newport County

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

Map

September 28, 2020

Dear Friends, Supporters and Community Members, 

At this time, Save The Bay’s facilities in Providence, Newport and Westerly remain closed to the public in response to COVID-19.

Save The Bay is now offering limited volunteer opportunities and Seal Tours and Nature Cruises, each with new policies and procedures for the health and safety of our guests and volunteers.

Our staff remains dedicated to working on our mission to protect and improve Narragansett Bay from home. As always, we are accessible via email (listed on our website), or on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.