Tides Blog

Westerly Town Beach Erosion

Saving The Bay at the Statehouse

Monday, January 21, 2019

This legislative session, Save The Bay will continue to advocate for laws that protect Narragansett Bay, Little Narragansett Bay, our coasts and our watershed; push our priorities; be on the lookout for new threats; and focus on three major issues: climate change, plastics pollution and the improvement of the Coastal Resources Management Council.

Microplastics Trawl

Trawling to Solve the Microplastics Problem

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Trawling to Solve the Microplastics Problem by Save The Bay Waterkeepers Mike Jarbeau, Kate McPherson, David Prescott We’ve all heard the stories and seen the pictures of giant mats of plastic trash floating in our oceans. But it’s not just an issue in faraway oceans on the other side of the globe. Plastic trash litters … Read More

Hog Island Dredge Site

Improving Dredge Policy in Rhode Island

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from dredge plans that would have damaged the environment for many years, and will continue to do so to protect the Bay and its habitats from being buried in sedimentary spoils.

ICC Trash Tally Sheet

The Problem with Plastics

Monday, January 7, 2019

The Problem With Plastics by Jonathan Stone, executive director, and Topher Hamblett, director of advocacy The cleanup of Narragansett Bay is a remarkable achievement that the people of Rhode Island and Massachusetts are rightfully proud of. Bay waters and beaches that were, just a generation ago, choked with raw sewage, industrial waste and other pollutants … Read More

A Nature Cruise on the Pawcatuck

Thursday, December 20, 2018

This nature cruise was my first time seeing a seal in the wild, and what an experience it was! The seal perched on a small rock in the middle of the river in the “banana pose”—with its head and back flippers into the air.

A rare calico lobster

The Many Colors of a Lobster

Monday, December 17, 2018

I am just amazed with how unique lobsters are, and as I think about the collection of Narragansett Bay lobsters at Save The Bay’s Exploration Center and Aquarium, the obvious thing that grabs my attention is their rare colorations.

Save Our State photo

Putting a Stop to that Big Parking Lot

Thursday, December 13, 2018

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting a Stop to that Big Parking Lot by Chris Cassaday, communications intern Save The Bay’s mission is to protect and improve Narragansett Bay. When new industrial developments surface that may upset the delicate balance of the Bay, we take swift action to prevent potential disasters. After the Quonset … Read More

Seaverge

New Boat. Same Mission.

Monday, December 10, 2018

New Boat. Same Mission. by Mike Jarbeau, Narragansett Baykeeper When Save The Bay’s fleet of small boats is hauled out of the water this time of year for winterization, we try to ensure that at least one of our trailerable boats is ready to respond on the Bay if needed. And as we pulled Seaverge … Read More

Comb jellyfish tank

A Day at the Aquarium: Check that off the Bucket List

Thursday, December 6, 2018

For intern Chris Cassaday, working at the aquarium for a day was a childhood dream come true. “Even as I pursued an education in creative writing, my passion for marine biology never faded. One of my lifelong dreams was to work at an aquarium, and Save The Bay helped me cross that off my bucket list.”

Kate McPherson, Riverkeeper

This Riverkeeper is Passionate About All Things Upstream

Monday, December 3, 2018

Meet Kate McPherson, our new Riverkeeper. A lifelong Rhode Islander who grew up fishing with her dad, this wetlands ecologist hails from North Smithfield, in the Branch River Watershed, and now lives in Harmony, in the Woonasquatucket River Watershed.

Save The Bay Membership and Individual Giving Manager Jackie Carlson with her family on a seal tour

What Our Members Mean

Thursday, November 29, 2018

What Our Members Mean by Jackie Carlson, membership and individual giving manager Save The Bay has been a member-based organization since 1970. What that means to us as an organization is that our members are critical to our efforts to protect and improve Narragansett Bay. What that mean to me, in my position as membership … Read More

BayCampers explore marine life in Narragansett Bay

Thank You For All of This

Monday, November 19, 2018

We were sitting on a mooring near Potter’s Cove on the west side of Prudence Island. The day could not have been any better, with the sun shining and a full day of marine science education behind us as our 20 or so campers enjoyed a swim off of the M/V Elizabeth Morris.

Trash collected at Common Fence Point

A Tale of Two Beaches

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Littering. It’s as easy as the flick of your wrist—but at what cost? With the plethora of beach cleanups occurring throughout Rhode Island, some might believe that every beach is spotless, but they’d be wrong. Littering is a collective issue that affects everyone, and thankfully, we’re fortunate to have volunteers who help make sure trash doesn’t degrade local beaches. I had the pleasure of participating in two Rhode Island cleanups during the 32nd annual International Coastal Cleanup Day: First Beach in Newport and Common Fence Point in Portsmouth.

River After Neighborhood

Where Have All The Rivers Gone?

Monday, November 12, 2018

We are deep in the headwaters of the Woonasquatucket River watershed in Glocester this morning, assessing road-stream crossings as part of Rhode Island’s River and Stream Continuity Pilot Project. Rivers and streams provide vital links connecting upland, wetland, and aquatic ecosystems… But there is growing concern about the role road crossings, and especially culverts, have in altering important habitats and ecosystems.

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Preserving a non-nuclearized Rome Point

Thursday, November 8, 2018

When a twin-reactor nuclear power plant was planned for construction at Rome Point, North Kingstown in 1972, Save The Bay sprung into action, rallying Rhode Island residents against the proposed facility and saving one of North Kingstown’s gorgeous nature preserves from being bulldozed over.

Rebecca Doran

Rebecca Doran: Shows the Many Ways to Save The Bay

Monday, November 5, 2018

Rebecca Doran: Shows the Many Ways to Save The Bay by Jackie Carlson, membership and individual giving manager Longtime Save The Bay member, swimmer, and supporter Rebecca Doran is, for the 12th time, taking the plunge to swim 1.7 nautical miles across Narragansett Bay as part of the 42nd Annual Save The Bay Swim in … Read More

Geanne Griffith: You’ve Got a Friend at the Aquarium

Monday, October 29, 2018

Geanne Griffith: You’ve Got a Friend at the Aquarium by Cindy Sabato, director of communications When Geanne Griffith, her husband, and their two cats moved to Rhode Island three years ago, Geanne didn’t wait long to jump right into the water—the water at our Exploration Center and Aquarium, that is. Geanne has been a volunteer … Read More

Why Vote Yes on the Green Economy and Clean Water Bond?

Thursday, October 25, 2018

As a native Rhode Islander, I’m proud of our state’s history of voting for major investments in the cleanup of Narragansett Bay. We have always stepped up for the Bay, as well as clean drinking water, open space and recreation, farmland protection, and the cleanup of polluted industrial sites.

Visions from the season’s first Nature Cruise

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Visions from the season’s first Nature Cruise by Eric Pfirrmann, fleet captain The 2018-1019 seal season is underway, and our first Westerly Nature Cruise down the Pawcatuck River on October 13 was a great start. Ten nature lovers braved a little drizzle and were rewarded with all kinds of fantastic wildlife. Cruising down river surrounded … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Changing the Oil Industry

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Fifty years ago, Save The Bay was founded by a group of Rhode Island residents who, concerned about the risks of oil spills in Narragansett Bay, fought hard to stop the proposed construction of an oil refinery in Tiverton.

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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