Saving The Bay has always been a community effort.

Save Our State photo

Would you believe, Save The Bay turns 50 in 2020?! When Save The Bay got started, we were the offshoot of an internationally-recognized victory by Save Our Community to defeat the locating of an oil refinery in Tiverton. Bookies were making bets that this little group wouldn’t last longer than six months. But John Scanlon, our first executive director, and his active Board went public and collected signatures from anyone who would sign the dotted line of commitment to Narragansett Bay. The group grew, from seven, to 7,000, and then 20,000. People who loved the Bay and knew how important it is to the state joined. The rest is history.

Saving the Bay has always been a community effort. We invite YOU to join our celebration of events between now and October 2020. Read community members’ favorite stories and memories of Narragansett Bay—and share your own. And revisit some of our historic victories. Come back to this site between now and the end of 2020 as we update it with new stories, photos, events, and more!

Join the Celebration

Narragansett Bay In Your Words...

Everybody should be able to use the Bay, from the fisherman to the tourist. So many people depend on the Bay for their living, but also just to be able to take a walk and not see garbage. We need organizations like Save The Bay. We need somebody there to make sure the next generation is protected.
Diana Oehrli

Revisit Some of Your Favorite Memories of Narragansett Bay

Rocky Point Shore Dinner Hall

Dinner with a View

Friday, March 27, 2020

“Oh the stories I have of working as a hostess at the Rocky Point Dinner Hall! Lots of celebs came through. The view of the Bay from there was incredible.

“Oh the stories I have of working as a hostess at the Rocky Point Dinner Hall! Lots of celebs came through. The view of the Bay from there was incredible. ...Read More

Child water skiing

Going Airborne

Saturday, March 21, 2020

One of my favorite childhood memories is learning to waterski behind my uncle’s speedboat when I was about 12 years old. It was in a cove off McCorrie Lane in Portsmouth.

One of my favorite childhood memories is learning to waterski behind my uncle’s speedboat when I was about 12 years old. It was in a cove off McCorrie Lane in... ...Read More

Woman on a stand-up paddleboard off Rome Point

Paddling on the Bay and in Life

Friday, March 13, 2020

The morning started off like so many others. The Bay looked smooth and glassy from my little cabin by the sea, the sunrise just about to peak over Fox Island and Jamestown. I sat on the couch and stared at it, much like I always do, and eventually stepped outside, paddle in hand, and headed across the street. I needed some flat water time in before work. Badly. So I stepped out onto the water…

The morning started off like so many others. The Bay looked smooth and glassy from my little cabin by the sea, the sunrise just about to peak over Fox Island... ...Read More

Rocky Point

Good Old Rocky Point

Friday, March 6, 2020

As a kid, so long ago, I spent many a times at a good ol’ place called Rocky Point Park. Yes, we used to have an amusement park in Rhode Island, set right on Narragansett Bay in Warwick!

My oldest memories are

As a kid, so long ago, I spent many a times at a good ol' place called Rocky Point Park. Yes, we used to have an amusement park in Rhode... ...Read More

Allan Gadoury holding two fish.

Fishing Memories from the 50s

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

My first experience in the Bay was in the 50s, digging quahogs with my family. Then my brothers and I graduated to fishing for flatfish and blues. No summer flounder were about. Striped bass were a mythical creature we only read about in the weekly fishing report.

My first experience in the Bay was in the 50s, digging quahogs with my family. Then my brothers and I graduated to fishing for flatfish and blues. No summer flounder... ...Read More

Riding the Ferry

Monday, January 13, 2020

I grew up in Newport and would ride the ferry several times a week when I was a child from the early 50s to the early 60s. I would actually ride with the captain in the wheelhouse. I became a ship captain myself because of it. The ferry pictured is the newer version of the ferry from the late 50s through the 60s.

I grew up in Newport and would ride the ferry several times a week when I was a child from the early 50s to the early 60s. I would actually... ...Read More

Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Three)

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Three) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the tide on pollution—both as a political advocacy powerhouse and educational pillar in the community—for 23 years before the staff addition of a Baykeeper. A dynamic, … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Three) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the... ...Read More

Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Two)

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Two) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the tide on pollution—both as a political advocacy powerhouse and educational pillar in the community—for 23 years before the staff addition of a Baykeeper. A dynamic, … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part Two) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the... ...Read More

Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part One)

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part One) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay’s Narragansett BayKeeper Is Coming, read a headline in the Spring 1993 Bay Bulletin. For 23 years, Save The Bay had made major steps in turning the tide on pollution as a political … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Putting Eyes and Ears on the Water (Part One) Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Save The Bay’s Narragansett BayKeeper Is Coming, read a headline... ...Read More

Fighting for Environmental Literacy

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Fighting for Environmental Literacy Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist When Congress passed the National Environmental Education Act of 1990 and installed the Office of Environmental Education within the Environmental Protection Agency, Save The Bay had already found our own educational niche. While Congress was making small steps to nationally … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Fighting for Environmental Literacy Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist When Congress passed the National Environmental Education Act of 1990 and installed the Office of... ...Read More

Making the Ocean State a leader in recycling

Igniting Mandatory Statewide Recycling

Monday, January 6, 2020

As the state contemplated burning the problem, Save The Bay and other environmental groups pushed for a strong recycling solution.

As the state contemplated burning the problem, Save The Bay and other environmental groups pushed for a strong recycling solution. ...Read More

Opened the Exploration Center and Aquarium in Newport

Friday, December 20, 2019

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Opened the Exploration Center and Aquarium in Newport By Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Following years of advocacy and restoration work, Save The Bay’s education program, ‘Explore The Bay,’ was officially established in 1986. The following two decades brought phases of rapid development, including the addition of vessel family … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Opened the Exploration Center and Aquarium in Newport By Mackensie duPont Crowley, communications specialist Following years of advocacy and restoration work, Save The Bay’s... ...Read More

The Save The Bay Community Through The Years

The Save The Bay Community Through The Years

Many thanks to our generous 50th Anniversary sponsors:

 

Sage Family Foundation

 

Navigant logo

REI logo

 

Logo of FL Putnam, 50th anniversary celebration sponsor

Thanks, Bank of America, for sponsoring our 50th Anniversary Celebration!

Thanks, Absolut!

 

BCBSRI, a 50th anniversary sponsor

MOO, one of our generous 50th anniversary sponsors

 

Thanks, Roger Williams University, for sponsoring our 50th anniversary celebration!

Many thank to Brown University for sponsoring our 50th Anniversary celebration

Coast-To-Coast Promotional Products logo

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

Map

July 7, 2020

Dear Friends, Supporters and Community Members, 

At this time, Save The Bay’s facilities in Providence, Newport and Westerly remain closed to the public in response to COVID-19. All internship and public programs remain suspended at this time.

Save The Bay has begun to post limited volunteer opportunities with new procedures for the health and safety of volunteers. Pre-registration is required. Learn more at www.savebay.org/volunteer.

Our staff remains dedicated to working on our mission to protect and improve Narragansett Bay from home. As always, we are accessible via email (listed on our website), or on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.