It Took a Community to Get Here

Save Our State photo

Would you believe, Save The Bay turns 50 in 2020?! When Save The Bay got started, we were the offshoot of an internationally-recognized victory by Save Our Community to defeat the locating of an oil refinery in Tiverton. Bookies were making bets that this little group wouldn’t last longer than six months. But John Scanlon, our first executive director, and his active Board went public and collected signatures from anyone who would sign the dotted line of commitment to Narragansett Bay. The group grew, from seven, to 7,000, and then 20,000. People who loved the Bay and knew how important it is to the state joined. The rest is history.

Saving the Bay has always been a community effort. We invite YOU to join our celebration of events between now and October 2020. Read community members’ favorite stories and memories of Narragansett Bay—and share your own. And revisit some of our historic victories. Come back to this site between now and the end of 2020 as we update it with new stories, photos, events, and more!

Join the Celebration

Narragansett Bay In Your Words...

Growing up, my father frequently took us fishing and shellfishing in Narragansett Bay and off the rocks at Beavertail. Learning to fish develops patience, perseverance, and confidence. Spending time on the water strengthens family relationships. Today, my husband and I made sure to introduce our children to activities on the water including fishing and water sports. They are now adults and when they return home during the summer they want to go fishing, open water swimming, kayaking, and paddleboarding. Narragansett Bay draws our family together.

Revisit Some of Your Favorite Memories of Narragansett Bay

Rachel M.

Saturday, August 3, 2019

My favorite memory, so far, is being out on the water with my husband and two kids this summer. You think summer is a time to slow down and relax but it feels even busier than the rest of the year—especially with two young kids. So, we try to enjoy every little bit of nice weather—on the boat, at the beach, everywhere—with each other.

My favorite memory, so far, is being out on the water with my husband and two kids this summer. You think summer is a time to slow down and relax... ...Read More

Linda S.

Friday, July 26, 2019

Back when my son was small, we spent a few summers on Jamestown. There are many special Bay-related memories but one of my favorites is of swimming at night in the bioluminescence.

Back when my son was small, we spent a few summers on Jamestown. There are many special Bay-related memories but one of my favorites is of swimming at night in... ...Read More

Jerry B.

Monday, July 22, 2019

When the Big Mamie was towed in from the Atlantic Ocean through Narragansett Bay and Mount Hope Bay to its final destination in Fall River Cove, my father, my mother and I were out in our 16-foot powerboat following her in to her final destination with hundreds of other boats.

When the Big Mamie was towed in from the Atlantic Ocean through Narragansett Bay and Mount Hope Bay to its final destination in Fall River Cove, my father, my mother... ...Read More

Alice L.

Friday, July 12, 2019

I remember being a small child and clamming at Oakland Beach with my father and his cousin, my brothers and my sister.

I remember being a small child and clamming at Oakland Beach with my father and his cousin, my brothers and my sister. ...Read More

The Bay That Saves Me!

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

For me over the past few years, the bay has become an escape from the everyday. It gets me away from the craziness of life, business, and the big cities. I love to kayak and fish the bay and I have incredible memories of…

For me over the past few years, the bay has become an escape from the everyday. It gets me away from the craziness of life, business, and the big cities.... ...Read More

Bay Bottom Blotch

The Birth of the Bay Bottom Blotch

Monday, April 29, 2019

My uncle, Aaron Cohen, one of my biggest fans, heard through a close friend working with Save The Bay that the organization was looking for a mascot to appear at an early fundraising meeting, to hit home the message that pollution in the Bay was a serious problem, with dire consequences. I earned the commission with my proposal for the creation of a weary, soggy, beleaguered creature called the Bay Bottom Blotch, who’d climb out of the bay, appear in the meeting room and deliver an impassioned speech about his intolerable living conditions.

My uncle, Aaron Cohen, one of my biggest fans, heard through a close friend working with Save The Bay that the organization was looking for a mascot to appear at... ...Read More

Newport Daily News photo of first Swim in 1977

Building the Swim Network

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The Bay community show up in greater or more visible numbers.

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The... ...Read More

Hog Island Dredge Site

Improving Dredge Policy in Rhode Island

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from dredge plans that would have damaged the environment for many years, and will continue to do so to protect the Bay and its habitats from being buried in sedimentary spoils.

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from... ...Read More

Save The Bay demonstration opposing Quonset megapart

Putting a Stop to that Big Parking Lot

Thursday, December 13, 2018

A fraction of the spoils of this dredge would fill in 500 acres—roughly 380 football fields—of the Bay around Quonset to create new land for pavement. The Draft Master Plan began to circulate in 1997, and Save The Bay caught wind of the impending disaster that could unfold if Quonset’s “megaport” became a reality.

A fraction of the spoils of this dredge would fill in 500 acres—roughly 380 football fields—of the Bay around Quonset to create new land for pavement. The Draft Master Plan... ...Read More

Rome Point Trail

Preserving a non-nuclearized Rome Point

Thursday, November 8, 2018

When a twin-reactor nuclear power plant was planned for construction at Rome Point, North Kingstown in 1972, Save The Bay sprung into action, rallying Rhode Island residents against the proposed facility and saving one of North Kingstown’s gorgeous nature preserves from being bulldozed over.

When a twin-reactor nuclear power plant was planned for construction at Rome Point, North Kingstown in 1972, Save The Bay sprung into action, rallying Rhode Island residents against the proposed... ...Read More

Aerial photo of World Prodigy Oil Spill in June 1989

Changing the Oil Industry

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Fifty years ago, Save The Bay was founded by a group of Rhode Island residents who, concerned about the risks of oil spills in Narragansett Bay, fought hard to stop the proposed construction of an oil refinery in Tiverton.

Fifty years ago, Save The Bay was founded by a group of Rhode Island residents who, concerned about the risks of oil spills in Narragansett Bay, fought hard to stop... ...Read More

Northeastern Petroleum Proposed Refinery Plan

Before We Could Save the Bay, We Had to Save a Community

Friday, August 17, 2018

In January 1970, at the end of a five-hour town council meeting, a sole voice of opposition stood against an otherwise unanimous vote to renew a permit. The renewal, requested by the Northeast Petroleum Refinery, Inc. was the company’s first step toward building an oil refinery in Tiverton, R.I. The voice of opposition belonged to a new councilwoman, Louise Durfee.

In January 1970, at the end of a five-hour town council meeting, a sole voice of opposition stood against an otherwise unanimous vote to renew a permit. The renewal, requested... ...Read More

Many thanks to our generous 50th Anniversary sponsors:

 

Sage Family Foundation

Navigant logo

REI logo

Logo of FL Putnam, 50th anniversary celebration sponsor

BCBSRI, a 50th anniversary sponsor

Thanks, Absolut!

Thanks, Roger Williams University, for sponsoring our 50th anniversary celebration!

MOO, one of our generous 50th anniversary sponsors

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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