It Took a Community to Get Here

Save Our State photo

Would you believe, Save The Bay turns 50 in 2020?! When Save The Bay got started, we were the offshoot of an internationally-recognized victory by Save Our Community to defeat the locating of an oil refinery in Tiverton. Bookies were making bets that this little group wouldn’t last longer than six months. But John Scanlon, our first executive director, and his active Board went public and collected signatures from anyone who would sign the dotted line of commitment to Narragansett Bay. The group grew, from seven, to 7,000, and then 20,000. People who loved the Bay and knew how important it is to the state joined. The rest is history.

Saving the Bay has always been a community effort. We invite YOU to join our celebration of events between now and October 2020. Read community members’ favorite stories and memories of Narragansett Bay—and share your own. And revisit some of our historic victories. Come back to this site between now and the end of 2020 as we update it with new stories, photos, events, and more!

Join the Celebration

Narragansett Bay In Your Words...

As a teen in the mid-60s my sister and I raced our BlueJay every single weekend at a regatta somewhere on the Bay. Predictably at each Edgewood regatta (Providence River just south of the STB headquarters) we would get into an argument over who would reach over the side to scrub off the brown oily slime that has coated our hull overnight. No way would we consider swimming to do the rest of the bottom. We carried a baggie of wet paper towels to clean our arm off afterwards. These days when sailing the Bay I am thrilled to see how much cleaner and clearer it is.
Gidget Loomis

Revisit Some of Your Favorite Memories of Narragansett Bay

Mackerel Cove, Jamestown RI, c 1877

80 Years of Memories

Monday, November 18, 2019

80 Years of Memories Narragansett Bay is a very special place for me. For more than 80 years, I have delighted in summer days there, staying at the waterfront family cottage in Jamestown. Swimming in the bay was (and is) my favorite activity there. Once I even swam in the bay from Dutch Island to … Read More

80 Years of Memories Narragansett Bay is a very special place for me. For more than 80 years, I have delighted in summer days there, staying at the waterfront family... ...Read More

Photo of Welcome to Harbour Island sign

Karl Marzocchi

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

My uncle had a home on the water on Harbor Island. We used to dig clams on the beach, dive for little necks in the black muck out in deeper water. Then in the evening we would build a fire on the beach and steam the clams in seaweed and eat the little necks on the half shell raw!

My uncle had a home on the water on Harbor Island. We used to dig clams on the beach, dive for little necks in the black muck out in deeper... ...Read More

Students on a boat-based marine science trip

Melissa Turner

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

During my first few years of teaching grade five in Newport, we would take out students out on a Save the Bay vessel to conduct water tests and trawl the bay. This trip sadly ended because we ran out of funding to support it. It was so disheartening as our students would come alive when … Read More

During my first few years of teaching grade five in Newport, we would take out students out on a Save the Bay vessel to conduct water tests and trawl the... ...Read More

Edgewood Yacht Club circa 1980s

Gidget Loomis

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

As a teen in the mid-60s my sister and I raced our BlueJay every single weekend at a regatta somewhere on the Bay. Predictably at each Edgewood regatta (Providence River just south of the STB headquarters) we would get into an argument over who would reach over the side to scrub off the brown oily … Read More

As a teen in the mid-60s my sister and I raced our BlueJay every single weekend at a regatta somewhere on the Bay. Predictably at each Edgewood regatta (Providence River... ...Read More

Children at the beach looking at horseshoe crabs

Tammy C.

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Horseshoe crabs! This past spring, the kids and I enjoyed a late afternoon at Goddard Park beach. We saw four pairs of mating horseshoe crabs right at the waterline. When we got home, we read about these “living fossils” in “Save The Bay’s Uncommon Guide” – a field guide to the flora and fauna of … Read More

Horseshoe crabs! This past spring, the kids and I enjoyed a late afternoon at Goddard Park beach. We saw four pairs of mating horseshoe crabs right at the waterline. When... ...Read More

Moonstone Beach, courtesy VisitRI.com

Don Fowler

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

My favorite memories were back in the 70s, when the Butler and Fowler families would drive from Cranston to Moonstone Beach, which was the best family beach in R.I. Our young children would swim in the adjacent salt pond while adults swam in the ocean. We all gathered moonstones. In the 80s, the beach became … Read More

My favorite memories were back in the 70s, when the Butler and Fowler families would drive from Cranston to Moonstone Beach, which was the best family beach in R.I. Our... ...Read More

Political cartoon depicting a condo at Black Point

Battle for Black Point and Public Access

Monday, November 18, 2019

Save The Bay has stepped in to defend Rhode Islanders’ right to the get to the shoreline and to use it as prescribed by the state constitution and to protect public access from the barriers of erosion and hardening of the shoreline. But in 1985, we embarked on a heated, five-year battle against a condominium developer that would help define public access issues in Rhode Island for decades to come. 

Save The Bay has stepped in to defend Rhode Islanders' right to the get to the shoreline and to use it as prescribed by the state constitution and to protect... ...Read More

Newspaper clipping from 1971 about establishment of the CRMC

Establish a Coastal Resources Caretaker

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Establish a Coastal Resources Caretaker by Cindy Sabato, communications One of Save The Bay’s very first actions was advocating for the creation of a state agency to manage development along Rhode Island’s coastline in a way that would also protect our invaluable coastal lands and waters. We know this … Read More

50 Ways We’ve Saved The Bay: Establish a Coastal Resources Caretaker by Cindy Sabato, communications One of Save The Bay’s very first actions was advocating for the creation of a... ...Read More

Photo of Save The Bay Swim in the 1970s

Building the Swim Network

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The Bay community show up in greater or more visible numbers.

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The... ...Read More

Headline from an old Bay Bulletin article: East Bay Communities Object to Dredging Plan

Improving Dredge Policy in Rhode Island

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from dredge plans that would have damaged the environment for many years, and will continue to do so to protect the Bay and its habitats from being buried in sedimentary spoils.

Dredging can be a very damaging process, but done correctly with the environment in mind, it can benefit development projects. Save The Bay has fought to protect the Bay from... ...Read More

A flotilla of shellfisherman help fight the Quonset Megaport

Putting a Stop to that Big Parking Lot

Thursday, December 13, 2018

A fraction of the spoils of this dredge would fill in 500 acres—roughly 380 football fields—of the Bay around Quonset to create new land for pavement. The Draft Master Plan began to circulate in 1997, and Save The Bay caught wind of the impending disaster that could unfold if Quonset’s “megaport” became a reality.

A fraction of the spoils of this dredge would fill in 500 acres—roughly 380 football fields—of the Bay around Quonset to create new land for pavement. The Draft Master Plan... ...Read More

A pristine Rome Point shoreline

Preserving a non-nuclearized Rome Point

Thursday, November 8, 2018

When a twin-reactor nuclear power plant was planned for construction at Rome Point, North Kingstown in 1972, Save The Bay sprung into action, rallying Rhode Island residents against the proposed facility and saving one of North Kingstown’s gorgeous nature preserves from being bulldozed over.

When a twin-reactor nuclear power plant was planned for construction at Rome Point, North Kingstown in 1972, Save The Bay sprung into action, rallying Rhode Island residents against the proposed... ...Read More

Many thanks to our generous 50th Anniversary sponsors:

 

Sage Family Foundation

 

 

Navigant logo

 

Thanks, Roger Williams University, for sponsoring our 50th anniversary celebration!

REI logo

 

 

Logo of FL Putnam, 50th anniversary celebration sponsor

 

 

 

BCBSRI, a 50th anniversary sponsor

 

 

Thanks, Absolut!

MOO, one of our generous 50th anniversary sponsors

Coast-To-Coast Promotional Products logo

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

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