Archive

Month: February 2019

Tributary river in a forest

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest

Thursday, February 28, 2019

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest by Kate McPherson, Narragansett Bay Riverkeeper Snow falls gently around the Narragansett Bay watershed; and the branches of the black oak, red maple and shagbark hickory are all bare. A month ago, despite the bitter cold, the white-breasted nuthatches in my … Read More

As the red tail flies: the link between the Bay and the watershed forest by Kate McPherson, Narragansett Bay Riverkeeper Snow falls gently around the Narragansett Bay watershed; and the... ...Read More

Photo of Save The Bay Swim in the 1970s

Building the Swim Network

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The Bay community show up in greater or more visible numbers.

Our community shows up to support our mission and answers our calls to action time and time again. The annual Swim is no exception—in fact, nowhere does the Save The... ...Read More

Losing track of time

Thursday, February 21, 2019

I remember sitting on the pilings under the Mount Hope Bridge in the mid-1960’s and fishing with my friend. We had to swim to get back to shore as the the tide came in and we were having such a good time, we hadn’t noticed! We used to catch flat fish, tautog and stripers! Back … Read More

I remember sitting on the pilings under the Mount Hope Bridge in the mid-1960’s and fishing with my friend. We had to swim to get back to shore as the... ...Read More

Rowing the Seekonk

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Rowing The Seekonk There was a time, not long ago, when the water of the Blackstone River—once called “America’s hardest working river”—changed colors and drained into the Seekonk River, and thence into Narragansett Bay. There were few fish, and frequent fish kills. The Seekonk was a disgusting, stinking cesspool. Today there are many kinds of … Read More

Rowing The Seekonk There was a time, not long ago, when the water of the Blackstone River—once called “America’s hardest working river”—changed colors and drained into the Seekonk River, and... ...Read More

Passing it down

Thursday, February 21, 2019

I grew up boating and fishing on these waters. I was able to pass the love for those activities to my children and now my grandchildren swim and kayak in the same waters. I treasure the time that I’ve spent with family past and present, in, on or around the water. Back to Stories & … Read More

I grew up boating and fishing on these waters. I was able to pass the love for those activities to my children and now my grandchildren swim and kayak in... ...Read More

First steps in the water at Sand Hill Cove

Thursday, February 21, 2019

I have been going to the beaches of Narragansett Bay my whole life and have many happy memories. My favorite memory is when I brought my oldest son to the beach the first time. It was at Sand Hill Cove. He was just over 1 year old and was walking. I held his hand while … Read More

I have been going to the beaches of Narragansett Bay my whole life and have many happy memories. My favorite memory is when I brought my oldest son to the... ...Read More

In 2018, Save The Bay presented the Rhode Island Saltwater Anglers Association with its Environmental Achievement Award.

Call for Nominations for Save The Bay environmental awards, open now through March 30

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Now through March 30, Save The Bay is accepting community nominations for its 2019 Environmental Achievement Award and Alison J. Walsh Award for Outstanding Environmental Advocacy.

Now through March 30, Save The Bay is accepting community nominations for its 2019 Environmental Achievement Award and Alison J. Walsh Award for Outstanding Environmental Advocacy. ...Read More

What’s Your Property Value Flood Risk?

Thursday, February 14, 2019

A recent study found that 2.5 million properties in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine lost $403.1 million in appreciation value because of increased tidal flooding caused by sea level rise. In Rhode Island alone, higher tides have left coastal property appreciation values lagging behind other home appreciation by $44.7 million since 2005.

A recent study found that 2.5 million properties in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine lost $403.1 million in appreciation value because of increased tidal flooding caused by sea... ...Read More

Volunteer Danielle Perry

Danielle Perry: A South Coast Center Powerhouse Volunteer

Monday, February 11, 2019

Two years ago, Save The Bay gained an energetic, determined volunteer in Danielle Perry, who spends her time working with children and doing research at Save The Bay’s South Coast Center in Westerly.

Two years ago, Save The Bay gained an energetic, determined volunteer in Danielle Perry, who spends her time working with children and doing research at Save The Bay’s South Coast... ...Read More

2017-2018 Seal Observations at Rome Point show a late-March peak

Save The Bay releases 2018 Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring Report, confirms stable seal population

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Save The Bay has released its third annual Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring Report, compiling decades of historical data with new information collected during last year’s seasonal monitoring efforts and the 2018 Bay-Wide Seal Count.

Save The Bay has released its third annual Narragansett Bay Seal Monitoring Report, compiling decades of historical data with new information collected during last year’s seasonal monitoring efforts and the... ...Read More

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

Map

December 1, 2020

Dear Friends, Supporters and Community Members, 

At this time, Save The Bay’s facilities in Providence, Newport and Westerly remain closed to the public in response to COVID-19.

In keeping with statewide COVID-19 health and safety recommendations, and out of an abundance of caution, Save The Bay is “pausing” all seal tours for the remainder of 2020. We hope to welcome you back aboard our education vessels in the new year.

Save The Bay is offering limited volunteer opportunities with new policies and procedures for the health and safety of our guests and volunteers.

Our staff remains dedicated to working on our mission to protect and improve Narragansett Bay from home. As always, we are accessible via email (listed on our website), or on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.