Archive

Year: 2018

Narragansett Bay: Always Changing, but Not Too Clean

Thursday, September 6, 2018

The question of whether Narragansett Bay has become too clean to sustain a healthy fishery was the main topic of the annual Ronald C. Baird Sea Grant Symposium, held at the University of Rhode Island’s Bay Campus in December. Reports from the 1800s tell us that Narragansett Bay was teeming with fish and natural resources readily available for harvest. Researchers point to many reasons why fisheries in the Bay have changed since then. But changed by what?

The question of whether Narragansett Bay has become too clean to sustain a healthy fishery was the main topic of the annual Ronald C. Baird Sea Grant Symposium, held at... ...Read More

Critter Tale: Are Diamonds Forever?

Thursday, August 23, 2018

They say that what is beautiful does not last. Such a statement may certainly be true of the diamondback terrapin, the endangered turtle whose Rhode Island populations are now dangerously low. We might take a lesson from the terrapin; in Rhode Island, anyway, it’s a lot like us.

They say that what is beautiful does not last. Such a statement may certainly be true of the diamondback terrapin, the endangered turtle whose Rhode Island populations are now dangerously... ...Read More

Make a World of Difference

Monday, August 20, 2018

Can you imagine 800,000 people picking up 20 million pieces of trash in one giant global beach cleanup? You don’t have to imagine it—you can be a part of it! This year’s International Coastal Cleanup is Saturday, September 15, and you can sign up to join it right here.

Can you imagine 800,000 people picking up 20 million pieces of trash in one giant global beach cleanup? You don’t have to imagine it—you can be a part of it!... ...Read More

Rendering of proposed oil refinery at Tiverton

Before We Could Save the Bay, We Had to Save a Community

Friday, August 17, 2018

In January 1970, at the end of a five-hour town council meeting, a sole voice of opposition stood against an otherwise unanimous vote to renew a permit. The renewal, requested by the Northeast Petroleum Refinery, Inc. was the company’s first step toward building an oil refinery in Tiverton, R.I. The voice of opposition belonged to a new councilwoman, Louise Durfee.

In January 1970, at the end of a five-hour town council meeting, a sole voice of opposition stood against an otherwise unanimous vote to renew a permit. The renewal, requested... ...Read More

Scenes along the Mattatuxet

Monday, August 13, 2018

I recall my first visit to this stretch of the Mattatuxet River in North Kingstown, located about a mile and a half upstream of Gilbert Stuart’s birthplace on Carr Pond. It was my first week as Save The Bay’s Riverkeeper, and on that particular day, I was meeting with the owner of Shady Lea Mill, neighbors, and engineers to facilitate the start of the second phase of dam removal.

I recall my first visit to this stretch of the Mattatuxet River in North Kingstown, located about a mile and a half upstream of Gilbert Stuart’s birthplace on Carr Pond.... ...Read More

The State of Narragansett Bay and Its Watershed

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

We’ve been asked: Isn’t the Bay saved already? The answer isn’t so cut-and-dry. In fact, the Bay is so much cleaner than it once was. And, it’s not as clean as it could, or should, be. What’s more, while many former threats, such as industrial factory waste, have been remedied, new and more complex threats are emerging. Skeptics may ask: how do we know?

We’ve been asked: Isn’t the Bay saved already? The answer isn’t so cut-and-dry. In fact, the Bay is so much cleaner than it once was. And, it’s not as clean... ...Read More

Swimming for the Bay: Open Water Swimming Tips from Elizabeth Beisel

Thursday, July 26, 2018

I am ecstatic to finally be a part of the Save The Bay open water Swim! We, as Rhode Islanders, must protect our waters in order to preserve them for the generations to come.

I am ecstatic to finally be a part of the Save The Bay open water Swim! We, as Rhode Islanders, must protect our waters in order to preserve them for... ...Read More

Homeschool is Cool on Narragansett Bay

Monday, July 16, 2018

Homeschooling began to grow in popularity in the 1970s when educational theorist John Holt advocated for the reform of public schools. In 2008, Save The Bay added a new program, Homeschool is Cool, to its robust set of marine science environmental education courses. Read more >>

Homeschooling began to grow in popularity in the 1970s when educational theorist John Holt advocated for the reform of public schools. In 2008, Save The Bay added a new program,... ...Read More

Save The Bay's 2018 Volunteers of the Year, Stacy Coutu and David Boulanger

Stacy Coutu and David Boulanger, 2018 Volunteers of the Year

Sunday, July 1, 2018

2018 Volunteers of the Year Stacy Coutu of Providence, R.I. and David Boulanger of Coventry, R.I. Stacy Coutu and David Boulanger are longtime friends who have become crucial participants in Save The Bay’s annual Swim. Each year, both volunteers are active before the sun has risen. Couto, a former Save The Bay staff member, joins … Read More

2018 Volunteers of the Year Stacy Coutu of Providence, R.I. and David Boulanger of Coventry, R.I. Stacy Coutu and David Boulanger are longtime friends who have become crucial participants in... ...Read More

Neil Marcaccio, shown here, was awarded Save The Bay's 2018 Bay Educator of the year for his dedication to connecting students with Narragansett Bay.

Neil Marcaccio, 2018 Bay Educator of the Year

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Neil Marcaccio, principal of Meadowbrook Elementary School in East Greenwich, is a passionate educator, scientist and steward of Narragansett Bay. As a principal, Marcaccio has worked to connect his entire school community with Save The Bay’s education team, allowing his students to see and experience the Bay both on the water and at Save The Bay’s Exploration Center in Newport.

Neil Marcaccio, principal of Meadowbrook Elementary School in East Greenwich, is a passionate educator, scientist and steward of Narragansett Bay. As a principal, Marcaccio has worked to connect his entire... ...Read More

*Please note:  Be sure to access the Johnson & Wales University Harborside Campus through the main entrance on Harborside Blvd. Your GPS may suggest taking Ernest Street to JWU’s Shipyard Street entrance, but that route requires a key card for entry.  

From Route I-95 North or South, take Exit 18 (Thurbers Avenue). Head downhill on Thurbers Avenue to US Route 1A (Allens Avenue). Turn right onto Allens Ave. Continue southbound on Allens Ave. into Cranston, where Allens Ave. becomes Narragansett Blvd. Turn left onto Harborside Blvd. at the traffic light by the Shell gas station. Follow Harborside Blvd. through the Johnson & Wales Harborside Campus. At the end of Harborside Blvd., turn right onto Save The Bay Drive. Save The Bay Drive becomes a circular, one-way roadway as you approach the Bay Center. Parking is available in four guest lots after you pass the main building. Enter the building through the main entrance.

Map

July 7, 2020

Dear Friends, Supporters and Community Members, 

At this time, Save The Bay’s facilities in Providence, Newport and Westerly remain closed to the public in response to COVID-19. All internship and public programs remain suspended at this time.

Save The Bay has begun to post limited volunteer opportunities with new procedures for the health and safety of volunteers. Pre-registration is required. Learn more at www.savebay.org/volunteer.

Our staff remains dedicated to working on our mission to protect and improve Narragansett Bay from home. As always, we are accessible via email (listed on our website), or on FacebookInstagram or Twitter.